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164 articles

Where have all the lightning bugs gone?

I’m not an entomologist—not even of the armchair variety.  Nor am I a conservationist, or a meteorologist.  My schooling in ecology does not extend beyond a single graduate-level course that dealt with how urban development disrupts various animals’ habitat and migration patterns.  And it is that course content that I can apply against a backdrop

Transmission towers need booster seats too. Allegedly.

Some infrastructural features are so ubiquitous and operate so effectively behind the scenes that they become almost invisible—like most utility lines.  Compared to many developed nations, the United States still has a sizable portion of its electrical and telecomm wires hoisted high into the sky through utility poles.  In fact, outside the densely populated downtowns

Bigger Washingtons (Part II): the remaining cities that honor George.

Continuing from where Part I left off, this article will explore the remaining 15 municipalities named Washington in the United States, the District of Columbia excluded.  Ranking them from least to most populous, the previous article covered the smallest eight; this will conclude with the seven bigger Washingtons, up to the most populous of all.

Hollywood Gateway: a pocket park with a preconceived plan. Will people partake?

Far be it from me to turn into a crotchety old killjoy who lambastes every pocket park I find, but I already did it once a few years ago, for a tidy but neglected little mini-playground in Alexandria, Virginia.  Since a bigger, higher-profile, and splashier (literally) play area stands just a few blocks away, my

Color choice: a gladiator match between brand green and brand red, in a strip mall coliseum.

The infamous book How to Lie with Maps initially offered a light-hearted attempt to explore how maps can entice, mislead, inflame, and generally propagandize, often without necessarily depicting anything geographically untruthfully.  Juxtapositions (not always to scale), labels, color choice, and infographics can all endow an editorial skew on what seems like objective spatial representation.  And

Where have all the lightning bugs gone?

I’m not an entomologist—not even of the armchair variety.  Nor am I a conservationist, or a meteorologist.  My schooling in ecology does not extend beyond a single graduate-level course that dealt with how

Transmission towers need booster seats too. Allegedly.

Some infrastructural features are so ubiquitous and operate so effectively behind the scenes that they become almost invisible—like most utility lines.  Compared to many developed nations, the United States still has a sizable

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