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99 articles

Resistance to Russia reaps rhetorical rewards in Riga.

I usually wait more than a few weeks before I offer a follow-up from an earlier post.  But if I learn something new almost immediately after posting—sometimes as a direct byproduct of the initial article—then I’m more than happy to revisit the subject, offering new insights or corrections as necessary.  More often than not, the

What’s a flag lot? A flag on a map looks very different from the view on the street.

I don’t really think that flag lot is part of common parlance anywhere outside of the domain of real estate and land development.  But it’s such a common condition—and such a simple concept to understand—that it’s kind of surprising most people don’t really know about it.  I certainly didn’t until I dipped my toe in

Support for Ukraine among neighbors: can a block form a bloc?

I will be overseas a fair part of this month, and I at least wanted to crank out one brief article before I leave.  While this article might, at first blush, seem to come out of nowhere, it bears a direct spatial resemblance to one I wrote just a few weeks ago: on a row

Wisconsin Avenue, a tony street, has a row of trashy homes. What gives?

By and large, what people refer to as Northwest DC—especially the area west of Rock Creek Park—has never faced the problems of disinvestment and depopulation that plagued much of the capital city in the 1970s and 80s.  Even at that point when Washington DC was “the murder capital of America” (as it was for a

Street sweeping: the cumulative effects of neglect aren’t easily swept away.

In 2024, it’s a rare moment when Washington DC is competently providing a municipal service we should all expect…and yet somehow, in this case, it’s disappointing.  I recognize that this is really my problem: my intent with this article was to say, “Here what a road looks like without street sweeping for an entire year”. 

Heritage infrastructure in Homecroft: when evoking the past, size matters.

Many, many years ago I featured some heritage infrastructure in the quasi-autonomous Indianapolis enclave of Homecroft.  If the most appropriate descriptor for a place like Homecroft is “quasi-autonomous enclave”, it goes without saying that it’s an unusual place.  The community (which functions largely as a neighborhood) sits about seven miles south of downtown Indianapolis as

Gourmet grocer with a vague name. There’s more to it than just “gourmet”.

Slaters Lane is a disproportionately important street in Alexandria, Virginia, considering its brief length.  From end to end, it measures only a half of mile, and an additional 500 feet of that length is a stub that dead-ends into an office/residential complex near the Potomac River a bit further eastward.  But the other ~2100 feet

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