Vesuvius erupts in the prairie.

In the world’s most overbuilt nation for retail space, any outside influence can induce an infinitesimal change that nonetheless completely transforms the landscape for commerce.  The retailers who continue to succeed in this economy—particularly impressive given the growing portent of online shopping’s eventual dominance—help shed light on what type of structures/milieus they are seeking to

Vitality behind venetian blinds.

My most recent post just went up on Urban Indy.  It is essentially an assessment of the Mass Ave retail corridor near downtown Indianapolis.  By most respects, it’s a lively, active urban corridor, attracting yuppies, guppies, buppies, empty nesters, DINKs, you name it–a contemporary spontaneous street ballet of conspicuous consumption.  It has great old architecture,

If a mall implodes in a small town, is anyone there to hear it–or to care?

I’ve documented evolving retail trends with a keen eye over the past few years.  Regardless of the size of the community, certain similar features have emerged that very well may augur a monumental shift in typology, akin to what transpired in the 1950s and 60s when pedestrian-scaled downtowns lost all their commerce to suburban strip

The right kind of sidewalk clutter.

My latest post–a short one (for me at least)–is now up at Urban Indy.  It focuses on the Mozzo, a newly completed multifamily residential development in the Sacred Heart neighborhood, fronting the increasingly active Virginia Avenue commercial corridor. By and large it’s a satisfactory building, with a massing that befits the old neighborhood just a

Buckeye boundary balderdash.

Here’s a rarity for me: plunging right into the photographs, with nary an introduction.  I don’t think it’s necessary this time. A few months ago, I was leaving Cleveland, Ohio on Interstate 71, headed southwestward toward Columbus. (Yes, that VW Beetle in front of me really is missing its rear windshield, in 25 degree weather.)  While

BOOK REVIEW: What Killed Downtown?

My latest is a first for me as a blogger: a book review.  The full-length review is now available at Urbanophile and should be accessible soon via other online outlets; I will update this blog post accordingly.  The book, Michael Tolle’s Who Killed Downtown? Norristown, Pennsylvania from Main Street to the Malls distinguishes itself through its

Browser band-aids.

It has been reported to me now by several sources that some people are having a difficulty reading my blog.  The two problems I hear about most frequently are 1) the text itself is missing from under the titles to each article; 2) the relevant links on the right-hand column don’t appear.  Virtually everyone who

Vesuvius erupts in the prairie.

In the world’s most overbuilt nation for retail space, any outside influence can induce an infinitesimal change that nonetheless completely transforms the landscape for commerce.  The retailers who continue to succeed in this

Vitality behind venetian blinds.

My most recent post just went up on Urban Indy.  It is essentially an assessment of the Mass Ave retail corridor near downtown Indianapolis.  By most respects, it’s a lively, active urban corridor,

The right kind of sidewalk clutter.

My latest post–a short one (for me at least)–is now up at Urban Indy.  It focuses on the Mozzo, a newly completed multifamily residential development in the Sacred Heart neighborhood, fronting the increasingly

Buckeye boundary balderdash.

Here’s a rarity for me: plunging right into the photographs, with nary an introduction.  I don’t think it’s necessary this time. A few months ago, I was leaving Cleveland, Ohio on Interstate 71,

BOOK REVIEW: What Killed Downtown?

My latest is a first for me as a blogger: a book review.  The full-length review is now available at Urbanophile and should be accessible soon via other online outlets; I will update this

Browser band-aids.

It has been reported to me now by several sources that some people are having a difficulty reading my blog.  The two problems I hear about most frequently are 1) the text itself