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Flag Day celebration (and quiz)! How one PA steel town bravely recognizes its past.

It’s Flag Day!  And it’s kind of remarkable how, given my blog’s fixation with flags over the years (including some very creative flag reimagining), I’ve never really covered this 75-year-old holiday, commemorating the 247th anniversary of a distinct American flag.  Yes, it was June 14th in 1777 that the Second Continental Congress adopted an official

Blank wall bravado: a trendy neighborhood’s supermarket is more and less than meets the eye.

This article represents an interesting first.  Frankly, I’m surprised it’s taken this long—15 years of blogging!—for someone to approach me about this while I was out snapping pics for my blog.  Given that I have over 20,000 photos consisting primarily of mailboxes, parking meters, cracked curbs, lonely utility poles, labelscars, and miscellany that would only

Sign regulations: what it looks like if your town generally lacks good ones.

“Signage” has long been the most prominently used keyword here at this blog.  Within its respective jurisdiction, a municipal planning community fixates more than the average person—more even than me—on signs: their placement, size, color, luminosity, content, what can exist.  The American Planning Association (APA) routinely devotes webinars like this on the subject, and, at

Transmission towers need booster seats too. Allegedly.

Some infrastructural features are so ubiquitous and operate so effectively behind the scenes that they become almost invisible—like most utility lines.  Compared to many developed nations, the United States still has a sizable portion of its electrical and telecomm wires hoisted high into the sky through utility poles.  In fact, outside the densely populated downtowns

A downtown without clear pedestrian advocacy: the Fort Worth example.

Many years ago—before I even had conceived of this blog—I was an intern for a university semester at WalkBoston, which was (and remains) the signature pedestrian advocacy organization for Bean Town.  Founded in 1990, it was the first of its kind in the country.  Since then (and since my internship), WalkBoston’s scope and ambitions have

Folk pop: the classic Mail Pouch Tobacco ad gets the meme treatment. For better health.

I’ve never bothered to discern what Pierre Bourdieu would probably brand the “echelons of taste” that distinguish “folk” from “pop”.  Their thematic intersection owes a great deal to the fact that they share a prosaic, anti-elitist undercurrent, but the commonalities probably don’t extend much further.  While both folk and pop eschew the highbrow ethos that

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Transmission towers need booster seats too. Allegedly.

Some infrastructural features are so ubiquitous and operate so effectively behind the scenes that they become almost invisible—like most utility lines.  Compared to many developed nations, the United States still has a sizable

Recent Comments

Recent Comments