Monthly Archives: October 2015

Why America deserves its retail blight.

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My latest was just published in full at Urban Indy.  It focuses on a new greenfield development proposed in Greenwood, the first suburb just south of Indianapolis.  The proposal, at a site just off of I-65 at County Line Road, includes 700,000 square feet of retail in what is anticipated to function as a lifestyle center arrangement, …Read more…

Perplexed in Pawtucket.

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My latest just made it to Huffington Post.  Fundamentally it’s about two cities and how they strategically toy with the boundary between them. The industrial city of Pawtucket has a prominent border with Providence, Rhode Island’s economically mixed state capital.  Both cities have their fare share of gritty neighborhoods, but, where the two abut one another, …Read more…

Google Street View: chronicling urban transformation.

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My latest just went up on Urban Indy.  I recently discovered the “time scroll” feature on Google Street View (though I suspect it’s been there for months–years even) and I decided to apply some comparative shots.  It’s really remarkable to see how much a neighborhood like Fountain Square in Indianapolis has changed since Google began …Read more…

Rising above the district dogma.

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Normally I have come to the defense of historic preservation as a both a discipline and an economic development tool. But, inasmuch as I support almost any effort to cultivate, recognize and then save heritage, I also know that the most sincere efforts can go up in flames when couched in the liberal use of …Read more…

Dirt becomes a cover.  

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I never intended this to become a photography blog, and, from the looks of things, I’ve stayed true to my word. Most of my photos are just as lousy as they were in 2009, when this thing began. The images are still there as an accompaniment–the bed of rice on which the meat and potatoes …Read more…

Tipping the hat to heritage.

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It sneaks up on us again: a cultural curiosity in the most unexpected of places. And, as is often the case, the object in question is not an overt landmark. The setting this time? Lewes, Delaware.This town of under 3,000 people sits just northwest of the flourishing Delaware Beaches region—on the opposite side of Cape …Read more…