Monthly Archives: October 2012

Massaging the main street.

I had hoped to get one more lengthy blog post published by the end of the month, but I’m unfortunately getting bogged down due to a persistent problem I have: the photos for the essay I have prepared are not sufficient, nor is the quality good enough, to get my point across.  Hopefully I will …Read more…

Because the rich can afford cosmetic surgery.

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While most evidence suggests that the future of the American metropolitan area will hinge upon further decentralization—after all, it has continued unabated for the last seventy years—most large metros have a few suburbs that buck the trend.  A few years ago I featured Bexley, a suburb of Columbus, Ohio, which largely matured in the middle …Read more…

Installing one life form; inhibiting another.

I can’t resist the occasional opportunity to showcase egregious impediments on sidewalks, particularly in locations where it seems like the arguments for pedestrianism are strongest, like in the downtown of this country’s 29th largest metropolitan area, Kansas City, Missouri.  The east side of Grand Boulevard just north of East 10thStreet offers a continuous, urban street …Read more…

From bookstore to lobby?

My latest is available now on UrbanIndy.com–about the possible loss of terrific retail space at the Barnes and Thornburg building  Though it’s probably only of local interest, I’ll mention it because of its opportunities for great photographs (provided I had a good camera and was a good photographer).  Here’s the outside of the building: And …Read more…

Amidst all the links in the chain, a new shape emerges.

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When zipping across a rural landscape on a limited access highway, the visual impact of the exit ramps—and the various goods or services that they access—begin to erode.  To those unfamiliar with the landscape, these exits often all look alike. Even for those motorists who know their precise surroundings, it would be hard to describe …Read more…

Tending the student flock.

With any urban infrastructure project dedicated exclusively to separating pedestrians from vehicular traffic, the benefit is typically a double-edged sword.  While the investment may allow pedestrians to cross on their own volition at any point in time, it also expedites the flow of traffic at higher speeds through what could be a pedestrian-dense area.  Instead …Read more…